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Christmas Gift Guide 5/6: Back to Basics

Katja Kokko | 14.12.2014

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This is a sponsored collaboration with Natural Goods Company

As some of you may have noticed, I’ve been on a bit of a DIY-kick lately, and on the prowl for products containing only cold-pressed vegetable oils, vegetable extracts, herbal distillates (floral waters) and minerals. Ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible, in other words.

On the other hand, I prefer my products to be high-quality and high-technology, and here are some things that can’t be manufactured without physically or chemically processed ingredients – shampoo, foaming cleansers, shower gels or ultra-light serums, for example.

When I first got into natural cosmetics, I was mad about herbal distillates and vegetable oils. I especially loved the spray distillates (there that face mist obsession, again). Once, on a trip to Paris, I visited a Naturalia shop and stuffed my bag as full of Melvita’s floral waters as I could manage – they were half the Finnish price.

I also had an arsenal of vegetable oils at home, and most of were out of date before I got the chance to use them up.

In preparation for the upcoming DIY project, floral waters and vegetable oils have once more lured their way into my life. And as the cornerstones of natural cosmetics, why shouldn’t they?

You can imagine my excitement when Laboratoire du Haut-Segala – a French brand exclusively specialized in floral waters and cold pressed vegetable oils – was made available at the Natural Goods Company web store. Currently only a few of the products are on the market in Finland, but the full collection should be made available very soon. The full range of products can be found at the company’s own website.

For today’s Christmas catalogue, I really wanted to compile the best distillate-and-oil duos for three different skin types. If you were unsure, floral waters are used much like toners are: applied to the face in the morning and evening after your cleanser, followed by a few drops of the oil; the nutrients in the oil are better absorbed through damp skin. You can also spritz floral water onto clean sheets or over your makeup to refresh the skin.

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Oily Skin

The perfect duo for oily and blemished skin is lavender water and apricot kernel oil. Lavender water minimizes pores, stabilizes sebum production and is mildly antiseptic. It can also be used to calm sunburns or insect bites. Light and quickly absorbing apricot kernel oil contains fatty acids and vitamins A and E, which help to soften and brighten the skin. A drop of essential oil can be added to the kernel oil, if preferred.

Dry and Sensitive Skin

For dry and sensitive skin I would recommend orange blossom water and almond oil. I love the sweet scent of the orange blossom water; the water itself calms, cools and hydrates the skin, and can even be used in cooking! Almond oil works wonderfully for sensitive skin, and can be used as an eye-makeup remover, or as a base for a massage oil. Like apricot seed oil, almond oil likewise includes unsaturated fatty acids, and vitamins A and E.

Ageing Skin

Rose water and argan oil is a well-known power duo for treating ageing skin. Rose water evens skin tone and gently contracts the pores, making it also suitable for younger skin. Antioxidant-rich argan oil has been the beauty secret of Moroccan women for centuries. The oil softens and repairs the skin, and can even be used to treat scarring. It also makes a wonderful hair oil, best applied before shampooing.

Do any of you have traditional flower waters or oils lying around in the cupboard? Share your favorites!

The Natural Goods Company web store offers free shipping within 2-5 days (Finland only).

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Photos Katja Kokko

Translation Katja Nikula

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